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This case study reviews a pilot test to remove PFAS risk via an in situ colloidal activated carbon barrier at Camp Grayling in Michigan, US - a large year-round military training center operated by the Michigan National Guard (MIARNG).

Case study highlights:

  • New, innovative approach using an in situ colloidal activated carbon barrier to eliminate PFAS exposure pathway and protect the community
  • Collaborative effort amongst various State of Michigan and military departments
  • Economical and effective pilot study design

Colloidal activated carbon was selected because of the expected rapid reductions of PFAS by removal from the dissolved mobile phase, as well as its expected lower total project costs when compared to operating a mechanical system over a similar time. The MIARNG decided to conduct a PlumeStop pilot test to determine if this treatment would meet their site goals prior to a possible full-scale application. The goals for this pilot project were to utilize an approach that could both protect the Grayling community from exposure and cost-effectively expand to a full-scale application.

 

About the Remediation Team:


REGENESIS Remediation Solutions
Michigan PFAS Action Response Team (MPART)
The Michigan PFAS Action Response Team (MPART) is the first multi-agency action team of its kind in the United States. Agencies representing health, environment and other branches of Michigan state government have joined together to investigate sources and locations of PFAS contamination in the state, to take action to protect people’s drinking water, and to keep the public informed as we learn more about this emerging contaminant. The State of Michigan is taking action to address this issue in a proactive and innovative way. Ten state departments, in coordination with local and federal officials across Michigan, are working together to ensure that the public health and safety of residents is protected while ensuring our environmental heritage is secure. Additional information regarding the State of Michigan’s response to PFAS can be found here.